Colter Bay RV Park – Grand Teton National Park

We spent one glorious week at the Colter Bay RV Park in Grand Teton National Park. The RV park books out far in advance, is on the expensive side, has narrow roads and less than level sites, and the cell signal is pitiful — but it’s one of the best places we’ve stayed. Located in Colter Bay Village, you’ll find the RV park is located a short walk from the swim beach on Jackson Lake, a visitor center, a grocery store, a gift shop, a gas station, two restaurants, a bar, the marina, and the laundry room with showers. Our site was a pull-through with full hookups and a picnic table. Restrooms and trash bins with recycling are scattered throughout the campground. Because Colter Bay is an actual little village, there are plenty of roads, sidewalks, and paved pathways where we were able to walk Max, which made it one of the more dog-friendly places we’ve stayed. For the first couple days of our stay, we had a pretty strong cell signal on AT&T (thanks to our WeBoost signal booster) and were able to function as normal. As the week progressed, the signal was still usable in the morning and evenings, but we headed to Jackson Lake Lodge during the day in order use their Wi-Fi so we could work. We didn’t use the restrooms, showers, or laundry, so I can’t comment on those. The best part about our site (O106) was that it was less than a minute walk to the Jackson Lake swim beach where we were able to drop our Kokopelli Packrafts into the water and also where we were able to enjoy some beautiful sunsets. We stayed at Colter Bay May 25th to June 6th, which seemed to be the perfect time: The weather was nice, excepting the first few rainy days; the park didn’t seem to have as many visitors as I’m sure it sees during the peak summer months; there was quite a bit of bear activity during our visit, possibly because they recently came out of hibernation; and the trails were pretty passable, though there was still some snowpack at higher elevations. Our week was incredibly enjoyable and relaxing, with plenty of opportunity to spend time outdoors, as well as eat some good food at Colter Bay Village’s John Colter’s Ranch House Restaurant & Bar and Jackson Lake Lodge’s The Mural Room.

Colter Bay RV Park

Grand Teton National Park

www.gtlc.com

  • Pull-Through Sites
  • Full Hookups
  • Picnic Table
  • Restrooms
  • Dump Station
  • Tent Sites
  • Cabins
  • Propane Fill
Site O106 – Very unlevel both front to back and side to side, but we were able to get things pretty square with a few lego bricks.
The bear warnings are never ending, but seeing as the only place we saw bear was right outside the entrance to Colter Bay Village, they are necessary.
Dogs aren’t allowed on the beach, so we enjoyed the view from a distance.
However, there are plenty of places within and right outside the campground that dogs are allowed. It wasn’t difficult to wake up in the morning to walk Max with those views!
The sunsets are pretty special!

During our stay, we took a scenic boat cruise on Jackson Lake. The Colter Bay Marina offers a few different cruise options and they can be booked right at the marina or at the activities booth located next to the general store and gift shop in Colter Bay. We learned a lot of interesting information about the park’s history as well as local wildlife, and we even saw an avalanche take place on Mount Moran. The tour guide said only 5% of visitors take advantage of the cruises offered, which is a shame, because it was very beautiful, informative, and allowed us to see aspects of the park from a different point of view.

We also did a little bit of our own cruising on the lake in our Kokopelli Packrafts!

We were pleasantly surprised by the food options available at the various restaurants within the park. We ate both breakfast and dinner at Colter Bay Village’s John Colter’s Ranch House Restaurant & Bar and Jackson Lake Lodge’s The Mural Room. The breakfast at both was okay, but dinner was fantastic. We also picked up pizza from the Cafe Court pizzeria in Colter Bay and that was delicious as well.

The Mural Room is the best place for dinner in the whole park, with fantastic views of the Teton Range.

Even if you don’t eat at The Mural Room, Jackson Lake Lodge is worth a visit. The views that are framed by the towering windows are a bit breathtaking. It was a nice place to be able to do some work for a few days when we weren’t getting a strong enough signal at our campsite. Besides The Mural Room, Jackson Lake Lodge also has a 1950s-style diner (The Pioneer Grill), a bar that serves food (The Blue Heron Lounge), and a coffee cart that also serves pastries and sandwiches. Make sure to take in the view from the outdoor terrace and you might be lucky enough to spy some moose! Of note, Jackson Lake Lodge also has a medical clinic that is open 9-5, seven days a week, May-September, no appointment necessary. The city of Jackson is a 40-minute drive, so it’s nice to know there’s help nearby in case something comes up.

There is a lot of great hiking in Grand Teton National Park for all skill levels, with trails ranging from .5 mile to 26 miles. We did the popular Hidden Falls Trails, though we started later in the day, so the trail wasn’t very busy. The trail starts in the Jenny Lake area, and is about 5 miles with 1200′ of elevation gain. The trail is rated moderate, which is a fair assessment, especially since it was quite wet and muddy at higher elevations, with some parts still snow covered. The hike offers great views of Jenny Lake and we saw a couple of moose and a number of marmots along the way.

You can take a shuttle boat across the lake to decrease the length of some of the longer trails by quite a bit.
The water in Jenny Lake is so clear!
We saw three moose along the hike. This guy and his buddy were hanging out right next to a busy part of the trail, unfazed by all the passersby.
The views are pretty great!
There was still some snow cover at higher elevations yet it was plenty warm enough for short sleeves.
Hidden Falls is approximately 100′ tall and was flowing ferociously thanks to all of the snow melt.
This is a great hike with an even better payoff!

We also did the Lakeshore Trail, which follows the Colter Bay shoreline with views of Jackson Lake and the Teton Range. It was flat and easy at 2 miles and wasn’t anything amazing, but it was close to our campsite and any time you can get outside and get some exercise, you should do it.

Any trail with views of the Tetons is a good trail!

A few miscellaneous pics…

We were lucky to see both grizzly and black bear during our visit. These guys hung out in the Pilgrim Creek area on a regular basis, so we saw them almost every day of our stay — sometimes close up, sometimes from a distance.

The view from the first overlook on Signal Mountain is pretty great. Coincidentally, you also get a great cell signal up here, thanks to the massive cell tower on top of the mountain. I believe there are some picnic tables and a pit toilet up top as well, so if you’re in need of an off-the-charts strong cell signal for an extended period of time, this is your place.

Snake River Overlook is technically outside the park, so an entrance pass isn’t required to see the spot where Ansel Adams took his famous photo of the Snake River and Teton Range in 1942 — a photo which helped promote and protect western U.S. landscapes. The trees have grown in a bit since the photo was taken, but as an Ansel fan, it was a neat feeling to stand where he once stood.

The grand lift of the Tetons is…a primal gesture of the Earth beneath a greater sky. -Ansel Adams

We drove down to Jackson one rainy day when we were getting a little stir crazy hanging out in the Airstream. Jackson is a nice little city, but was pretty busy even on this rainy, late spring day. Of course we had to get our picture under one of the infamous antler arches, but we also stopped into the Pendleton store to do a little shopping and stopped by the grocery store to pick up a few essentials.

Our week in Grand Teton was one of our favorite weeks in the 500+ days we had been on the road up to that point. We would definitely stay at Colter Bay RV Park again. It was quite peaceful, even though we arrived the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend, it’s absolutely gorgeous, there are a couple of good food options, and even though dogs aren’t allowed on trails, there are so many areas that we could walk Max that I have no problem calling Grand Teton a dog-friendly park.

 

 

How We Work on the Road

The number one thing that most people want to know when we tell them we live in our Airstream and travel full time is what do we do for work.

As I’ve mentioned in a previous post, we own an ERP consulting business that we started six years ago. We’ve worked from home for the last six years, so there wasn’t a dramatic work-related lifestyle change when we decided to begin traveling. We did, however, search out the best products, devices, and services that would allow us to continue working remotely without interruption.

Cell Phones

We have three AT&T cell phones (two personal, one business) with unlimited data. We also have one Verizon cell phone (which is a spare) with unlimited data. We are able to use these as hotspots when needed. It’s nice to have options, as the cell signals can differ significantly between the two companies. A bonus with the AT&T phones is that we can stream HBO on DirecTV Now and it doesn’t count against our data usage. With the Verizon phone, we get NFL Mobile, so we never have to miss a Packer game! All of the phones are supposed to slow down after using 22GB, but we’ve maxed out on one of the phones this month and have not noticed a slow down where we’re currently staying.

Verizon Jetpack 6620L MiFi

The MiFi is a wireless router that acts as a mobile wifi hotspot. We also have unlimited data with this, but once we hit 15GB, it’s supposed to be throttled to 600kbps. You can find more information about the MiFi here, although our particular version is no longer available.

WeBoost RV Cellular Signal Booster

We bought the weBoost Drive 4G-X RV signal booster to help boost our cell and data signals in areas where they may be lacking. From their website: “The Drive 4G-X RV is our powerful in-vehicle cell phone signal booster kit certified for use anywhere in the US. The Drive 4G-X RV boosts voice and data with max FCC-allowed 50 dB system gain, enhancing 4G LTE, as well as 3G network signals, up to 32x. RVers get fewer lost connections and dead zones, better call quality as well as faster data uploads and downloads whether parked or in motion in their RV.  Works in all classes of RV; Class A, Class C and all towables.” An antenna needs to be installed on the top of the trailer and is connected to an indoor desktop antenna. We’ve noticed that you need to be within a few feet of the indoor antenna in order for the signal to be boosted, which generally works fine as the antenna is in the storage compartment above the kitchen table. When we’re in the bedroom in the back of the trailer, we generally have a weaker signal. You can find our particular model here.

The weBoost antenna on the top of our trailer

Computers

Travis uses a 27″ iMac 3.4GHz Intel Core i7 with 32GB of RAM and a 3TB Fusion Drive. When we are towing, the iMac gets secured in a Gator Cases Tote Bag, available from Amazon here. The bag fits perfectly in the space at the end of his bed so we don’t need to worry about it sliding around at all. I use a 13″ MacBook Pro 2.3GHz Intel Core i5 with 16GB of RAM and a 500GB SSD Drive.

Gator Cases Creative Pro Series Nylon Carry Tote Bag for Apple 27″ iMac Desktop Computer
Fits perfectly at the end of the twin bed in our International 27FB

Printer

We found the perfect printer for our needs! We purchased the HP OfficeJet 250 All-in-One Portable Printer with Wireless & Mobile Printing. It wirelessly scans, copies and prints (in color, if needed). It has a battery so it only needs to be plugged in occasionally to charge. The best part?! It easily fits in the drawer beneath the bench along with packs of paper. You can find it on Amazon here.

Fits in the bench drawer with room to spare!