Glacier NP and the West Glacier KOA

We visited Glacier National Park in July of last year, but were only able to spend five days — which was not nearly enough. We knew then that we would return for a longer stay in the near future, which turned out to be August 9-23 of this year. We spent two amazing weeks in West Glacier at the West Glacier KOA, which is one of only 19 KOA Resorts amongst the 480+ KOA properties throughout North America. We had friends fly in from D.C. and Tampa to help us celebrate my 40th birthday. They stayed in one of the Deluxe Cabins, which is a great way for friends and family to join RVers on the road in great destinations like Glacier. During their 4-day visit, we explored trails and lakes and waterfalls and hiked/walked almost 88,000 steps, or more than 37 miles. We drank whiskey and beer and ate burritos and churros and trout. The guys went whitewater rafting and we all enjoyed campfires in the evening. Their visit flew by, as did our 2-week stay, and we’re pretty sure that Glacier National Park will be a place we return to again and again.

Read about our July 2018 visit here.

West Glacier KOA

355 Half Moon Flats Rd, West Glacier, MT 59936

www.koa.com

  • Full Hookups
  • Pull-Thru Sites
  • Cabins
  • Tent Sites
  • Picnic Tables
  • Fire Pits
  • RV Sites with Tent Pads
  • Cable TV (Limited to 4 Channels)
  • Restrooms with Showers
  • Laundry
  • Dump Station
  • Nature Trail
  • Propane Fill
  • Playground
  • Basketball Court
  • Horseshoe Pits
  • Fenced Dog Park
  • Two Swimming Pools (1 Family, 1 Adults Only)
  • Gift Shop
  • Cafe (Serves Breakfast & Dinner)
  • Ice Cream Shop
  • Sunday Morning Worship Service
  • Weekly Mobile Dog Groomer
  • Nightly Entertainment (Wildlife Expert, Magic Show, Music, etc.)
  • 2.5 Miles to West Entrance of Glacier National Park

Our site, #166, was a back-in Super Site with full hookups and a tent pad. It’s on the end of a row and backs up to a tree line. It’s next to a bathroom, which was very convenient for when we our friends were hanging out at our site. We LOVED our site. It was huge and quiet and pretty private for a KOA.

There are a number of things that we enjoyed about this KOA:

For such a large property, it’s pretty quiet. Because we were in an end site that backs up to trees, our stay may have been quieter than if we were in a different site, but overall, the place was pretty low key even though it was at max capacity most nights

The sites are well spaced apart. Again, this might have something to do with our particular site. We didn’t walk the entirety of the campground, but every site we saw looked nice.

Breakfast and dinner are available every day, which is very convenient for those days you don’t feel like making a meal or going out.They have a pretty substantial breakfast menu each morning, along with pastries for purchase. There’s also a coffee bar to get your day started right. Each evening, Gene mans the grill, where you have a choice of trout, ribs, flat iron steak, or ribeye steak. The ribs were pretty good but the trout was our favorite (we didn’t try either of the steaks).

The. Adult. Pool. Is. Everything. Due to most people staying at KOAs with kids, the family pool was always pretty busy. However, the adults only pool never had more than a half dozen other people at it and was incredibly peaceful. There are also two small hot tubs at the adult pool — again, very nice to enjoy without kids.

The location to the national park entrance gets two thumbs up. It’s only a couple of minutes drive into West Glacier Village, where you’ll find the west entrance of the park, a post office, an urgent care clinic, the newly opened West Glacier RV Park & Cabins, a motel, a food market, retail/gift shops, coffee cart, ice cream, a bar, and a cafe.

Mobile dog grooming? Yes, please. Every Saturday, a woman brings her RV that’s converted into a mobile dog grooming salon to the West Glacier KOA. There’s a sign-up sheet in the office. This was super convenient for us, as Max hadn’t been groomed in a very long time due to having a back injury. Also, it’s really hard to get a dog in for grooming on short notice in most places and we’re usually not somewhere long enough for it not to be short notice. She did a great job and Max was done in less than an hour, unlike the three hours that are normally required at other groomers.

Things to Do

Hiking

Avalanche Lake

The hike to Avalanche Lake can be anywhere from 4.6 to 6 miles roundtrip, depending on how far you continue along the lakeshore once you reach the lake. This trail can be busy, as there is a shuttle stop at the trailhead (which is actually the Trail of the Cedars Trailhead), and is accessible during the off-season months when the Going-to-the-Sun Road is closed. There’s ample parking, but as with most trails in any national park, the earlier you get there the better. However, we didn’t arrive at the trailhead until 9am on a Saturday during mid-August and we were able to find a parking spot. The trail is rated as moderate and seemed to be popular with families. We did this hike on an overcast day, but the views from the lake were still gorgeous. We hiked the extra distance to the opposite side of the lake, as most people stop on the near side. Only a few parties continued to the far side which made it a quiet and peaceful place to drop in with our Kokopelli Packrafts and paddle around for a bit. Drive time from West Glacier entrance: ~32 minutes

The beginning of the trail starts on the Trail of the Cedars, which is a 0.9-mile loop.
Much of the trail is through a forested, mossy wonderland along Avalanche Creek.
This is as far as most people go, but another 0.7 mile will get you to the other side of the lake.
Even on a gloomy day, the views were beautiful!
It wasn’t the most ideal conditions for the packrafts, but any time you can paddle around on a glacial lake is a good time.

Saint Mary Falls and Virginia Falls

We did this hike last year when we visited and both Travis and I remembered it as being easier than it was this year. We accessed the trail from the Saint Mary Falls Trailhead, but you can also start at the Saint Mary Falls Shuttle Stop or from the boat dock on Saint Mary Lake. The first mile of the hike is pretty flat and fairly easy, and brings you to the three-tiered Saint Mary Falls. This a good place to turn around for those who aren’t very steady on their feet. If you continue an additional three-quarters mile up the trail, which starts to gain and lose elevation regularly just pass Saint Mary Falls, you’ll reach Virginia Falls, which is approximately 50 feet tall. Drive time from West Glacier entrance: ~1 hr, 15 min

A few tips:

  • Throughout the hike, there are a handful of smaller unnamed falls, and some people may mistake these for Virginia Falls and turn around before reaching the actual Virginia Falls.
  • The earlier in the season you visit, the more impressive the falls will be. That’s true for any of the 200+ waterfalls located throughout Glacier. We visited Glacier in mid-July last year and mid-August this year and noticed a big difference.
  • There is a third waterfall that can be reached from the Saint Mary Falls Trailhead, though the Sunrift Gorge Trailhead is a closer option. When starting the hike to Saint Mary and Virginia Falls, you’ll see a sign that says Baring Falls to the left, while the other two are to the right. We’ve never hiked it, so I can’t comment on the difficulty of the trail or the brilliance of the falls. I believe it’s about a mile to the falls from where the trail splits in two directions.
  • There’s a pit toilet near Virginia Falls if needed, though don’t expect it to be as nice as the pit toilets you find at trailheads. And pack your own toilet paper.
Saint Mary Falls
One of the unnamed falls along the trail.
Virginia Falls

Iceberg Lake

The trailhead to Iceberg Lake is found behind the Swiftcurrent Motor Inn in the Many Glacier area of the park. There are a number of hikes that leave from this area, so everything I read about the Iceberg Lake hike said that arriving early is important, even though there’s a very large parking lot. We did this hike on a drizzly Monday morning and when we arrived at the parking lot around 7:30am, there was quite a bit of parking still available. Maybe it was because of the weather, maybe it was because it was Monday, but whatever the reason, we probably could have shown up at 8 or 8:15 and still been fine. The park’s hiking guide rates this hike as very challenging, though AllTrails says moderate. Even though it’s about 10 miles roundtrip and has approximately 1800′ of elevation gain, I’d have to agree with moderate. About halfway along the trail is Ptarmigan Falls, which is a nice place to stop for a snack. There’s also a pit toilet here, but as with the one by Virginia Falls, it’s more of an outhouse and requires you to bring your own toilet paper. Once we reached the brilliant turquoise lake, which was sans icebergs (we missed them by a few weeks), the wind really picked up and it was freezing. We spent a short time at the lake before heading back and being treated to some moose sightings along the trail. Drive time from West Glacier entrance: ~2 hr, 10 min

We hit the road early and were able to see the sun rise along the Going-to-the-Sun Road.
Most of the trail looks like this: Fairly flat, along the side of a cliff, with views of the mountains ahead and lush, green valley below.
We were lucky to see a couple of handsome moose both on the way to and from the lake.
No icebergs to be seen, but still a nice hike.
There was a blanket of fog overhead for the majority of the morning, but it didn’t detract from the great views.
There were so many wildflowers along the way!
We did this hike the morning of my 40th birthday. In this photo, I’m pretty sure I was thinking — what a silly thing to do — wake up at 5am, drive four and half hours roundtrip, and hike 10 miles in an almost constant drizzle/rain. Silly, indeed.

Hidden Lake Overlook

This is another very popular hike in Glacier, but with good reason. It’s rated as challenging, or moderate, but is less challenging than other moderate hikes we’ve done. It’s fairly accessible, as the trailhead is right behind the Logan Pass Visitor Center. At 2.6 miles roundtrip, the payoff is pretty great without having to put a lot of miles in. The hike can be extended an additional 1.2 miles each way if you choose to hike down to the lake itself. We saw what seemed like every rodent that calls the park home as well as a momma mountain goat with her babe. It’s a busy trail, but one that I would say should be on your must-do list. We arrived at 12:30 on a Saturday afternoon and were lucky enough to score a parking spot without having to circle the parking lot for too long. Drive time from West Glacier entrance: ~1 hr, 3 min

Another gloomy day, but the view of the lake from the overlook was still pretty great.
This little guy was gorging on all of the flowers.
This grazing mom and baby mountain goat kept their distance, but didn’t seem bothered in the least by everyone watching them.
The views are this incredible along the entirety of the trail.

Whitewater Rafting

While I stayed back at the Airstream with Max, the guys went whitewater rafting with Glacier Raft Company. They enjoyed it, but it was a little tame for their liking. As with the waterfalls in the park, the water level and flow of the Flathead River peak in early June and slowly recede throughout the summer.

Food & Drink

Wandering Gringo Cafe

Delicious tacos, quesadillas, and burritos the size of your head. Cash only.

Glacier Distilling Company 

They specialize in small-batch whiskey but also offer brandy, vodka, gin, rum and liqueurs. Do some tastings, order a cocktail, or buy a bottle to take home — or all three.

La Casita

The rafting guide swore by their chimichangas, so we partook after our hike to Iceberg Lake. We also sampled the margaritas and churros. ‘Twas a delicious trifecta!

West Glacier Restaurant

Located right in West Glacier Village, a good place to stop for breakfast, lunch, or dinner either on your way in or out of the park. The food was good, the service was fast, and the prices were reasonable.

Boat Club Restaurant – Lodge at Whitefish Lake

The Lodge is a 40-minute drive from the West Glacier KOA. We visited on a busy Sunday afternoon, so the service was a tad bit slow, but the views made up for it. Whitefish is a fantastic town and deserves to be explored, but we only had time for a quick lunch at the lake.

North Fork Pizza

Located in Columbia Falls, North Fork Pizza is about a 20-minute drive from the KOA. The pizza is fantastic and worthy of the drive.

In Conclusion…

The Glacier National Park area does not disappoint. It’s not the easiest to get to, but everyone should try their best to get there. When the park was established in 1910, there were 150 active glaciers. Today, only 26 remain. By 2030, that number may be zero. The park itself is mind-blowing, but there is so much in the area that we haven’t yet gotten a chance to explore — Kalispell, Whitefish, Flathead Lake, etc. We spent 45 glorious days in the great state of Montana this summer, but it looks like we’ll need to spend more.

Colter Bay RV Park – Grand Teton National Park

We spent one glorious week at the Colter Bay RV Park in Grand Teton National Park. The RV park books out far in advance, is on the expensive side, has narrow roads and less than level sites, and the cell signal is pitiful — but it’s one of the best places we’ve stayed. Located in Colter Bay Village, you’ll find the RV park is located a short walk from the swim beach on Jackson Lake, a visitor center, a grocery store, a gift shop, a gas station, two restaurants, a bar, the marina, and the laundry room with showers. Our site was a pull-through with full hookups and a picnic table. Restrooms and trash bins with recycling are scattered throughout the campground. Because Colter Bay is an actual little village, there are plenty of roads, sidewalks, and paved pathways where we were able to walk Max, which made it one of the more dog-friendly places we’ve stayed. For the first couple days of our stay, we had a pretty strong cell signal on AT&T (thanks to our WeBoost signal booster) and were able to function as normal. As the week progressed, the signal was still usable in the morning and evenings, but we headed to Jackson Lake Lodge during the day in order use their Wi-Fi so we could work. We didn’t use the restrooms, showers, or laundry, so I can’t comment on those. The best part about our site (O106) was that it was less than a minute walk to the Jackson Lake swim beach where we were able to drop our Kokopelli Packrafts into the water and also where we were able to enjoy some beautiful sunsets. We stayed at Colter Bay May 25th to June 6th, which seemed to be the perfect time: The weather was nice, excepting the first few rainy days; the park didn’t seem to have as many visitors as I’m sure it sees during the peak summer months; there was quite a bit of bear activity during our visit, possibly because they recently came out of hibernation; and the trails were pretty passable, though there was still some snowpack at higher elevations. Our week was incredibly enjoyable and relaxing, with plenty of opportunity to spend time outdoors, as well as eat some good food at Colter Bay Village’s John Colter’s Ranch House Restaurant & Bar and Jackson Lake Lodge’s The Mural Room.

Colter Bay RV Park

Grand Teton National Park

www.gtlc.com

  • Pull-Through Sites
  • Full Hookups
  • Picnic Table
  • Restrooms
  • Dump Station
  • Tent Sites
  • Cabins
  • Propane Fill
Site O106 – Very unlevel both front to back and side to side, but we were able to get things pretty square with a few lego bricks.
The bear warnings are never ending, but seeing as the only place we saw bear was right outside the entrance to Colter Bay Village, they are necessary.
Dogs aren’t allowed on the beach, so we enjoyed the view from a distance.
However, there are plenty of places within and right outside the campground that dogs are allowed. It wasn’t difficult to wake up in the morning to walk Max with those views!
The sunsets are pretty special!

During our stay, we took a scenic boat cruise on Jackson Lake. The Colter Bay Marina offers a few different cruise options and they can be booked right at the marina or at the activities booth located next to the general store and gift shop in Colter Bay. We learned a lot of interesting information about the park’s history as well as local wildlife, and we even saw an avalanche take place on Mount Moran. The tour guide said only 5% of visitors take advantage of the cruises offered, which is a shame, because it was very beautiful, informative, and allowed us to see aspects of the park from a different point of view.

We also did a little bit of our own cruising on the lake in our Kokopelli Packrafts!

We were pleasantly surprised by the food options available at the various restaurants within the park. We ate both breakfast and dinner at Colter Bay Village’s John Colter’s Ranch House Restaurant & Bar and Jackson Lake Lodge’s The Mural Room. The breakfast at both was okay, but dinner was fantastic. We also picked up pizza from the Cafe Court pizzeria in Colter Bay and that was delicious as well.

The Mural Room is the best place for dinner in the whole park, with fantastic views of the Teton Range.

Even if you don’t eat at The Mural Room, Jackson Lake Lodge is worth a visit. The views that are framed by the towering windows are a bit breathtaking. It was a nice place to be able to do some work for a few days when we weren’t getting a strong enough signal at our campsite. Besides The Mural Room, Jackson Lake Lodge also has a 1950s-style diner (The Pioneer Grill), a bar that serves food (The Blue Heron Lounge), and a coffee cart that also serves pastries and sandwiches. Make sure to take in the view from the outdoor terrace and you might be lucky enough to spy some moose! Of note, Jackson Lake Lodge also has a medical clinic that is open 9-5, seven days a week, May-September, no appointment necessary. The city of Jackson is a 40-minute drive, so it’s nice to know there’s help nearby in case something comes up.

There is a lot of great hiking in Grand Teton National Park for all skill levels, with trails ranging from .5 mile to 26 miles. We did the popular Hidden Falls Trails, though we started later in the day, so the trail wasn’t very busy. The trail starts in the Jenny Lake area, and is about 5 miles with 1200′ of elevation gain. The trail is rated moderate, which is a fair assessment, especially since it was quite wet and muddy at higher elevations, with some parts still snow covered. The hike offers great views of Jenny Lake and we saw a couple of moose and a number of marmots along the way.

You can take a shuttle boat across the lake to decrease the length of some of the longer trails by quite a bit.
The water in Jenny Lake is so clear!
We saw three moose along the hike. This guy and his buddy were hanging out right next to a busy part of the trail, unfazed by all the passersby.
The views are pretty great!
There was still some snow cover at higher elevations yet it was plenty warm enough for short sleeves.
Hidden Falls is approximately 100′ tall and was flowing ferociously thanks to all of the snow melt.
This is a great hike with an even better payoff!

We also did the Lakeshore Trail, which follows the Colter Bay shoreline with views of Jackson Lake and the Teton Range. It was flat and easy at 2 miles and wasn’t anything amazing, but it was close to our campsite and any time you can get outside and get some exercise, you should do it.

Any trail with views of the Tetons is a good trail!

A few miscellaneous pics…

We were lucky to see both grizzly and black bear during our visit. These guys hung out in the Pilgrim Creek area on a regular basis, so we saw them almost every day of our stay — sometimes close up, sometimes from a distance.

The view from the first overlook on Signal Mountain is pretty great. Coincidentally, you also get a great cell signal up here, thanks to the massive cell tower on top of the mountain. I believe there are some picnic tables and a pit toilet up top as well, so if you’re in need of an off-the-charts strong cell signal for an extended period of time, this is your place.

Snake River Overlook is technically outside the park, so an entrance pass isn’t required to see the spot where Ansel Adams took his famous photo of the Snake River and Teton Range in 1942 — a photo which helped promote and protect western U.S. landscapes. The trees have grown in a bit since the photo was taken, but as an Ansel fan, it was a neat feeling to stand where he once stood.

The grand lift of the Tetons is…a primal gesture of the Earth beneath a greater sky. -Ansel Adams

We drove down to Jackson one rainy day when we were getting a little stir crazy hanging out in the Airstream. Jackson is a nice little city, but was pretty busy even on this rainy, late spring day. Of course we had to get our picture under one of the infamous antler arches, but we also stopped into the Pendleton store to do a little shopping and stopped by the grocery store to pick up a few essentials.

Our week in Grand Teton was one of our favorite weeks in the 500+ days we had been on the road up to that point. We would definitely stay at Colter Bay RV Park again. It was quite peaceful, even though we arrived the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend, it’s absolutely gorgeous, there are a couple of good food options, and even though dogs aren’t allowed on trails, there are so many areas that we could walk Max that I have no problem calling Grand Teton a dog-friendly park.