Zane Grey RV Village

We spent only one night here as we drove from Page, Arizona to Casa Grande, Arizona, so this will be a quick one! What a delightful find this place was! Zane Grey is a fairly small, incredibly clean, ridiculously cute RV park sitting amongst beautiful trees next to the West Clear Creek. Our site (#50) was incredibly level (yay!), large, and easily accessible.

Address: 4500 E. Hwy 260, Camp Verde, AZ 86322

Phone: (928) 567-4320

  • 96 Full-Hookup Sites with 14 Pull Throughs
  • Laundry
  • Restrooms with Showers
  • Communal Fire Pit
  • Walking Trail
  • Dog Run

Seeing as we were here for less than a day, the only site we took in was the Montezuma Castle National Monument, which is a five-story, twenty-room pueblo built by Sinagua farmers. It was less than a 20-minute drive from the RV park and was neat to see. Entry is free for up to four adults with a National Parks Access Pass or $7 per person.

 

Two Weeks in Page, AZ

We spent two weeks in Page, Arizona on Lake Powell, which, at this time of year, is at least a week too long. The winter offseason doesn’t end until about mid-April, so some of the best things Page has to offer, like the boat tour and hike to Rainbow Bridge, aren’t readily available until later in the year. Even so, we were able to take advantage of some nice-weather days and experience some of the awe-inspiring local attractions.

But first…

We stayed at Wahweap RV & Campground located on Lake Powell in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. The campground is huge and caters to all types of campers, from tents to enormous fifth wheels and motorhomes; however, there are only a couple of ‘loops’ open this time of year. When making the reservation, we were told the best views are from C loop, but when checking in, were told C loop was closed and we’d be in F loop. Disappointing, yes, because the views ARE better from C loop, but understandable as they only want a few bathrooms (that need to be cleaned) open and access to only a few dumpsters (that need to be emptied). Seeing as Wahweap is part of a national recreation area, there is a $25 National Parks Service fee that is good for seven days. Your National Parks Access Pass will cover it. The campground and the neighboring Lake Powell Resort are part of an area called the Lake Powell Resorts and Marinas that include five campgrounds, three sticks & bricks lodging options, and five marinas. During prime season, they offer a slew of boat trips on the lake, as well as watercraft rentals, house boat rentals, fishing, and multiple dining options. It’s clear that this campground and the resort are seasonal destinations and I’d love to see the vibe and atmosphere during busier times. That being said, we tried to make the best of our time here, even though the weather didn’t often cooperate (lots of rain and wind) and Travis had to fly out to visit a customer onsite for five days.

Address: 100 Lakshore Drive, Page, AZ 86040

Phone Number: (888) 896-3829

  • 130 Full Hookup Sites
  • 112 Tent or Self-Contained RV Sites
  • 36 Tent Only Sites
  • 6 Group Sites (9-30 People per Site)
  • Restrooms with Flush Toilets
  • Coin Laundry
  • Showers ($2/15 Minutes)
  • Wahweap Swim Beach
  • Campground Store

Things to See and Do in the Area

Antelope Canyon: Antelope Canyon is a slot canyon located in Page on Navajo land. Because of this, you need to book a tour with one of the local tour companies in order to experience the canyon, which has two distinctly separate sections; Upper Antelope and Lower Antelope. We toured Lower Antelope Canyon with Dixie Ellis’s Tours. Visit their website here. Check our Instagram post here for tips and information regarding our tour. If you don’t want to take part in a tour but still want to see slot canyons, there are others in the area. Waterholes Canyon is just south of Horseshoe Bend, but a permit to access Navajo land is needed.

Horseshoe Bend: Horseshoe Bend was not at all what I expected! While I knew it was a bend in the Colorado River (270 degrees, to be exact), I didn’t realize it’s beauty would take my breath away. This is definitely one of those cases where photos won’t do it justice — you have to see it in person. It’s located a couple miles southwest of Page on Hwy 89. You can’t miss the parking lot, which has port-a-potties, but no other services are (currently) available. There is a three-quarter mile (one way) hike to the viewing area for Horseshoe Bend. I call it a hike, because part of it is uphill and part of it is downhill, both of which are over loose surfaces. Bring water and an umbrella or hat if it’s especially warm out. As the number of visitors has increased dramatically over the last few years, there are a handful of updates underway to make visiting Horseshoe Bend more accessible and safer. These include an accessible 1-mile long trail and rim viewing platform, restrooms, potable water, and a parking lot expansion.

Glen Canyon Dam: A 710-foot dam on the Colorado River in Page that helps ensure an equitable distribution of water between the states in the Upper Colorado River Basin and the Lower Basin, although critics argue that the dam is responsible for evaporative losses of Lake Powell and ecological impact on the Grand Canyon, which lies downstream. Tours are available.

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument: Utah’s newest national monument, Escalante spans nearly 1.9 million acres. Needless to say, it takes a lot of time to come close to exploring a fraction of this area. If you’re a hiker, this is the place for you. There are hikes of varying lengths and degrees of difficulty. If you opt for a multi-day hike, a free overnight camping permit is required. We made the smallest of dents here. I wouldn’t even call it a dent; a nick, really. We drove the 25 miles from Wahweap northwest along Hwy 89 into Utah to the southern edge of the Escalante to the Toadstool Trailhead, easily found between mile markers 19 and 20. The hike is short and of easy difficulty, and you’re exposed to the toadstool hoodoos, balanced rock formations that look like mushrooms.

Hiking: We didn’t do much hiking while here, unfortunately, although we did hike the Hanging Gardens Trail. The trailhead can be found at a parking lot right before the bridge on the Page side of the dam. It was fairly easy and is only about 1 mile roundtrip, unless you follow the wrong path, like we did (stay straight when it looks like you should go left). There’s also an 8-mile Rim Trail that circles the city of Page that we didn’t get to.

We did not get to visit the following places this time, but that just means we’ve saved stuff for next time!

Rainbow Bridge National Monument: Deemed the world’s highest natural bridge, Rainbow Bridge is accessible by a boat ride from Wahweap Marina at the Lake Powell Resort plus a mile-ish (depending on water level) hike or, if you’re feeling adventurous, you can hike 16-18 miles around Navajo Monument to reach Rainbow Bridge. We would’ve loved to make the trek via boat, but there aren’t many boat trips scheduled this time of year, and the ones offered just didn’t work out for us.

Vermilion Cliffs National Monument: This national monument is located directly west of Page, but straddles the state line, so part of it also lies in Utah. The Navajo Bridge Visitor Center is a 40-mile drive from Page.

Zion National Park: Page is known as the “Center of the Grand Circle” due to it’s proximity to Zion, Bryce Canyon and the Grand Canyon. Zion is located 115 miles west of Page.

Bryce Canyon National Park: Known for its crimson-colored hoodoos, Bryce is located 133 miles northwest of Page.

Grand Canyon National Park: Both the North Rim and the South Rim are located about 115 miles from Page and both will take about two and half hours to get to. The North Rim is considerably less crowded, cooler, and at higher elevation than the South Rim; however, it’s only accessible by car May 15 to November 1. Backcountry permits are required by hikers and cross-country skiers the rest of the year.

Kaibab National Forest: The 1.6-million-acre forest borders both the North and South Rims of the Grand Canyon. If driving to the North Rim, you’ll enter Kaibab 75 miles southwest of Page.

As for the city of Page itself, there isn’t a whole lot there. It seems the town exists strictly for tourists to come and check out the natural wonders in the area. There’s a grocery store and a Walmart, some gas stations and a Denny’s, a post office and a municipal airport. We ate at a few of the local restaurants; Big John’s Texas BBQ (the ribs were fab) and Slackers, a burger joint that was surprisingly good. We also ate dinner at the Driftwood Lounge at the Lake Powell Resort, and that was  also surprisingly good. I think the biggest draw to Page, besides Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend, is the lake. Unfortunately, it’s not very usable this time of year. If we pass through the area again, we’ll make sure it’s a little later in the year.

Snow Canyon Campground at Snow Canyon SP

Snow Canyon State Park is a 7400-acre park tucked amid lava flows and sandstone cliffs in Southwest Utah. Within the park is the 31-site Snow Canyon Campground.

Campground Info:

Address: 1002 Snow Canyon Drive, Ivins, UT 84738

Phone Number: (435) 628-2255

  • 14 Sites with Electric and Water and 4 Sites with Electric Only ($25/night)
  • 13 Sites without Hookups ($20/Night)
  • Restrooms with Flush Toilets
  • Showers (Free)
  • Dump Station
  • Water Spigots for Drinking Water
  • Group Campsites
  • Park Office Located within Campground
  • Recycle/Trash

We stayed in site 14, which is at the end of the row of 14 pull-through sites in the middle of the campground. These 14 sites are tight and even though they are paved, are not very level. Each one of the pull-through sites has a covered picnic table and a grill. If we were to return to Snow Canyon, we would try to get site 15A or 15B, which offer more privacy and nicer views.

Site 14 – It looks large enough, but this photo was taken when the site next to us was empty. A second rig fits in the spot to the left of the shade structure on the right side of the photo.
It’s hard to tell from the photo, but there are 5 sites pictured here. They are quite narrow and the website warns that you may not be able to use your slideouts in these sites.

Park Info:

We checked in late Tuesday afternoon and left early Saturday morning, so we really only had three days to explore the park. Seeing as those three days were week days and we need to work most of the time during the week, we didn’t really explore this park as much as we could have. There are more than 38 miles of hiking trails, a three-mile paved walking/biking trail, technical climbing and more than 15 miles of equestrian trails. However, dogs are only allowed on two trails, so this park isn’t as dog-friendly as other state parks.

We were able to get in a few different hikes:

Cinder Cone Trail: 1.5 miles. Difficult. Steep slopes, loose uneven surfaces. Hike among “lava clinkers” as you corkscrew 500 feet to the top of an extinct volcano where you can view a volcano crater and panoramic scenery.

The cinder cone wasn’t as impressive as we were expecting, but it was still interesting to see. The Cinder Cone Trail is accessible from outside the north end of the park.

Petrified Dunes to Butterfly Trail to Lava Flow Trail:

  • Petrified Dunes: 1.2 miles. Moderate. Some steep slopes, uneven surfaces. This route crosses massive Navajo sandstone outcrops and sand dunes frozen in time.
  • Butterfly Trail: 2 miles. Moderate. Some steep slopes, steps and uneven surfaces. Winding along the west side of Petrified Dunes, this trail leads to West Canyon Overlook and lava tubes.
  • Lava Flow Trail: 2.5 miles. Moderate. Uneven surfaces. Hike through a jumbled lava field, the vivid remains of a long-ago volcanic eruption.
Petrified Sand Dunes
Petrified Sand Dunes
At the intersection of the Butterfly Trail and Lava Flow Trail is a lava tube, which was formed during the most recent eruption (more than 27,000 years ago) of the now extinct volcano to the northeast.
The entrance to the lava tube. The tube is fairly long and fun to explore — just remember to bring your headlamp as it’s very dark inside!
Lava Field

Johnson Canyon: Closed annually from March 15 to September 14 – 2 miles. Easy. Level with some rocky slopes and steps. Leads to a sheltered canyon of willow and cottonwood, winding through lava flows and red rock to an arch spanning 200 feet.

Along the trail to the canyon…
The entrance to the canyon…
The arch from a distance. I really enjoyed this trail because it was a nice departure from the trails we’d been experiencing in the Southwest. There were trees, and a small stream, and toads croaking — it was just nice to hear nature.
The Arch (and this is as close as you can get)

In the Area:

The city of St. George (population 82,000+) is about a 20-minute drive from the campground. You’ll find grocery stores, gas stations, restaurants, a post office, movie theatre, shopping, and basically anything you could need. There’s a cute, downtown historic area where we ate dinner at a fantastic restaurant called The Painted Pony and got delicious cupcakes from TwentyFive Main. There is also an airport in St. George, which is the second busiest airport in Utah after Salt Lake City.

Just south of the south entrance of the park is the Red Mountain Resort that has a spa where I got massage one day. It was nice to get a little pampering after being on the road for so long!

Zion National Park is less than 60 miles away — about an hour and fifteen minute drive.

How We Receive Mail on the Road

A common question we get when people find out we are full-time travelers is how we get our mail. It’s easier (most of the time) than you may think.

Everyone has a domicile, with domicile meaning a legal relationship between a person and a place. Everyone with a driver’s license, vehicle registration, insurance of any type, and that pays taxes, needs to have a legal domicile. For most, it’s where they live. But when you don’t ‘live’ anywhere, when you don’t have a fixed place of residence, you need to establish an address to use as your legal domicile address. Some people use a family member’s or a friend’s address, and that is definitely an option, especially if they live in the same state you’ve most recently lived in. Two caveats in this scenario are that that person will have to deal with your mail, and, if they ever move, you’ll have to change your address as well. This is why many full-timers choose to set up a domicile address with a mail service. The three states that most full-time travelers use as domiciles are Texas, Florida and South Dakota and we chose South Dakota. To learn more about establishing a domicile, read our post about it here.

All of our regular USPS mail is sent to our address in South Dakota. We can also have any packages sent there shipped via any other carriers, but we try to avoid doing that so we don’t have to pay to have them shipped to our current location. We get an email any time a new piece of mail arrives and I’m able to look online to see what it is (they scan the front of each piece of mail). When we want our mail, I schedule a shipment and our mail is sent to us. But where is it sent?, you ask.

  • Our Current Location – Many campgrounds will accept mail on your behalf; just check with them how it should be addressed in order for it to get to you. Also, make sure they accept mail from all carriers — USPS, UPS, FedEx, Amazon. Not all carriers can make general deliveries to all locations.
  • USPS General Delivery – The local post office will accept general deliveries on your behalf and hold on to them for up to 30 days. Always call the post office to see if they accept general deliveries before having something sent there (the USPS website can be inaccurate). Also, they only accept things shipped via the USPS, so don’t expect them to accept your Amazon packages. This has worked great for us when we’ve stayed at State Parks/National Parks. The address for general deliveries is: Your Name, General Delivery, City, State, Zip Code. Make sure the package is addressed to whoever is picking it up as you may need to present your ID.
  • UPS Store – Just as the USPS accepts USPS-shipped packages on your behalf, UPS Stores will accept UPS-shipped packages on your behalf; however, they may charge a fee. Again, call the store to make sure they offer this service.
  • Amazon Locker – Amazon Lockers are secure, self-service kiosks where customers can pick up Amazon.com packages at a time and place that is convenient for them. When you check out on Amazon, there’s a ‘Find an Amazon Locker’ option when choosing your delivery address. This service is most likely only available in cities of a certain size, but is also a great option for anyone who doesn’t want their packages stolen off their front porch.

So, that’s it! It’s fairly simple, but be forewarned, things move slowly this way. We often receive our mail about three weeks later than if we were in a bricks and sticks home. Make sure to sign up for paperless for everything you can. Our mail service will open and scan something if we request it, so we’re able to read the important stuff in a timely manner.

 

Atlatl Rock Campground at Valley of Fire SP

Campgrounds Info:

There are two campgrounds within Valley of Fire State Park: Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock. Both are first come, first served and Arch Rock, the more primitive of the two, is open seasonally. We chose to stay at Atlatl Rock because the sites are bigger, easier to maneuver, and more suitable for RVs, although we did see some people squeeze some fairly large rigs into spots at Arch Rock. We scored a nice pull through spot in the RV section! The RV sites are $10 more per day than the other sites, which are $20 per day. A lot of people seem to leave in the morning around 8-8:30, so the best time to arrive is around 9am. We showed up about 1:15 on a Wednesday afternoon and there were a couple of RV sites available, but the weekends during mild-temperature months are likely pretty full. There are amazing views at every turn throughout the park, and the campgrounds are no exception. They are clean and quiet and a lot of the sites are pretty private. We were blown away by the beauty of this park and we will definitely be back!

Address: 29450 Valley of Fire Road, Overton, NV 89040

Phone Number: (702) 397-2088

Amenities at Atlatl Rock Campground:

  • 44 Campsites – Half are semi-primitive (water spigot, shaded picnic table, fire ring, grill) and half are RV only (electric and water hookups, shaded picnic table, fire ring, grill).
  • Bathrooms with Flush Toilets
  • Showers (Free)
  • Self-Service Pay (Cash or Check Only)
  • Dumpsters
  • Ash Cans
  • Dump Station
  • Onsite Camp Hosts
Distant view of our site in Atlatl Rock Campground
Our site (#44) was a pull-through and had water and electric hookups.
Each site has a shaded picnic table, fire ring, and grill.
The view out our window of the moon rise.

Park Info:

There’s a $10 entrance fee to get into the park that can be put towards your campground fee. The park itself is doable in one day, but I’d allow at least two days to see the sites. The visitor center has little cards titled “What to Do & See in Valley of Fire…” …if you have two hours, …if you have half a day, and …if you have a full day. Recommendations for a full day are:

  • Drive White Domes Road and Fire Canyon Road; stop and take in the scenic vistas at areas such as Rainbow Vista and Fire Canyon
  • Hike the 1.25-mile roundtrip White Domes Trail, the 1.5-mile roundtrip Fire Wave Trail, and the 3/4-mile roundtrip Mouse’s Tank Trail
  • Check out the Native American petroglyphs at Atlatl Rock picnic area
  • Visit Arch Rock
  • Stop at the “Cabins” to see the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) enrollees who built the park’s infrastructure in the 1930s
  • Do the 1/8-mile walk to see Elephant Rock
  • Spend some time checking out the displays in the visitor center. Learn about Valley of Fire’s geologic history, human history, and flora and fauna
  • Stop at some sites along the main road, such as the 1/4-mile Petrified Logs Loop Trail and Seven Sisters picnic area
Slot canyon on the White Domes Trail, which was our favorite trail.
The remains of a movie set along the White Domes Trail. The 1965 movie was called ‘The Professionals’.
The Fire Wave at the end of the Fire Wave Trail.
Petroglyphs in Petroglyph Canyon along Mouse’s Tank Trail.
Sunset at Arch Rock
Petrified log at Petrified Logs West — Almost 225 million years old!
We were fortunate to see a herd of Desert Bighorn Sheep while driving along White Domes Road!

In the Area:

The city of Overton is less than a half-hour drive from Atlatl Rock Campground, or less than 20 minutes from the East Entrance of the park. There’s a grocery store, a gas station, a post office (that accepts general delivery), a McDonald’s, and a couple of local restaurants. Hoover Dam is about 60 miles away and is accessible through Lake Mead Recreational Area, which is six miles from the East Entrance of the park. Las Vegas is about an hour drive to the southwest.

We weren’t sure what to expect at Valley of Fire before arriving, but a handful of people that we had spoken to in the Las Vegas area said it was spectacular, and they were right! We were totally awed by it’s beauty and will definitely be back!