Fort Dodge RV & Camping Resort

As we continue our journey towards Wisconsin, we made what was supposed to be a two-night stop, but became a three-night stop, in Dodge City, Kansas. The weather along our route has been cold and windy and we decided to sit tight an extra day when our original travel day had a forecast of sustained winds of 35 mph with gusts up to 50.

Fort Dodge RV Park is a fairly new, well laid-out park. We had a long pull through site with full hookups. Due to the below freezing temps, we filled our fresh water tank upon arrival and put the hose away for the rest of our stay so it wouldn’t freeze. During our stay, we left the trailer once to go to the grocery store and once to drive around town to check things out. Otherwise, we stay snuggled inside to avoid the brutal wind and cold temps.

Even though the park was nice, we wouldn’t stay again, for two reasons: 1) Dodge City doesn’t really have a lot happening, and 2) The park just doesn’t feel secure and we felt like sitting ducks at times. Surrounding the RV park is a soccer field, a dog park, a city park with free zoo, and a water park. The soccer field is so close to the RV park property that on our first night there, people watching soccer parked in the RV park parking lot and sat at their picnic tables. Anyone and everyone had access to the RV park, because there’s no gate. This must be a continuing issue for them because the main building (office/store, bathrooms/showers, laundry room, storm shelter) has a sign on the door that says ‘No Public Restrooms’. At one point, we were the only ones staying in the park and seeing as the office is only open from 4pm-8pm, we were often completely alone. I usually use the showers at parks/campgrounds if they’re decent because I like to take a long shower when I can and it’s easier to wash my hair than it is in the Airstream, but the accessibility of this place to the outside world made me uncomfortable – anyone could walk into the bathroom at any moment. The facilities, however, are very nice, and when there are more people around, I’m sure there’s a different vibe.

Address: 701 Park Street, Dodge City, KS 67801

Phone Number: (620) 371-7177

Amenities:

  • Full Hookups
  • Pull Throughs
  • PicnicTable
  • Fire Ring
  • Tent Sites
  • Cabins
  • Restrooms
  • Showers
  • Laundry
  • Storm Shelter
  • Store
  • Adjacent Dog Park
Nice, Long, Concrete, Pull-Through Sites — Almost (But Not Quite) Level
All Alone

A Very Brief Stay in Santa Fe

We stopped in Santa Fe for less than 20 hours and saying that’s too brief an amount of time in that city is an understatement. We look forward to when we’re able to return and explore more. That being said, while in Santa Fe, we stayed at Santa Fe Skies RV Park. We didn’t have a lot of time to explore the RV park, but from what we experienced, it’s a nice, clean, quiet park located 15-20 minutes from everything Santa Fe has to offer. The gentleman that checked us in was very nice and we were able to get our propane filled while there.

Address: 14 Browncastle Ranch, Santa Fe, NM 87508

Phone Number: (877) 565-0451

Amenities:

  • Full Hookups
  • Pull-Through Sites
  • Restrooms
  • Showers
  • Laundry
  • Propane
  • Mail Service
  • Walking Trail
  • Dog Park
  • Picnic Area

After getting settled into our site at Santa Fe Skies, we went to get a bite to eat at a local brewery, Duel Brewing. For drinks, Travis had the Bad Amber ale and I had a Pinon Kola — both were great. To eat, we split the Frankenthaler (smoked trout sandwich) and the Pollock (meatball sandwich) and they were so, so good. If you’re ever in the area, stop in.

And while you’re still in the neighborhood, check out Meow Wolf, an immersive interactive art experience. From their website: “Meow Wolf’s House of Eternal Return in Santa Fe, New Mexico, is an explorable, immersive art installation filled with technology and fantastic environments to inspire visitors of all ages. The wildly imaginative art space is a collaboration of over 100 local artists and is a unique combination of children’s museum, art gallery, jungle gym, and fantasy novel.” It’s really something that needs to be experienced firsthand in order to understand it.

 

Zane Grey RV Village

We spent only one night here as we drove from Page, Arizona to Casa Grande, Arizona, so this will be a quick one! What a delightful find this place was! Zane Grey is a fairly small, incredibly clean, ridiculously cute RV park sitting amongst beautiful trees next to the West Clear Creek. Our site (#50) was incredibly level (yay!), large, and easily accessible.

Address: 4500 E. Hwy 260, Camp Verde, AZ 86322

Phone: (928) 567-4320

  • 96 Full-Hookup Sites with 14 Pull Throughs
  • Laundry
  • Restrooms with Showers
  • Communal Fire Pit
  • Walking Trail
  • Dog Run

Seeing as we were here for less than a day, the only site we took in was the Montezuma Castle National Monument, which is a five-story, twenty-room pueblo built by Sinagua farmers. It was less than a 20-minute drive from the RV park and was neat to see. Entry is free for up to four adults with a National Parks Access Pass or $7 per person.

 

How We Receive Mail on the Road

A common question we get when people find out we are full-time travelers is how we get our mail. It’s easier (most of the time) than you may think.

Everyone has a domicile, with domicile meaning a legal relationship between a person and a place. Everyone with a driver’s license, vehicle registration, insurance of any type, and that pays taxes, needs to have a legal domicile. For most, it’s where they live. But when you don’t ‘live’ anywhere, when you don’t have a fixed place of residence, you need to establish an address to use as your legal domicile address. Some people use a family member’s or a friend’s address, and that is definitely an option, especially if they live in the same state you’ve most recently lived in. Two caveats in this scenario are that that person will have to deal with your mail, and, if they ever move, you’ll have to change your address as well. This is why many full-timers choose to set up a domicile address with a mail service. The three states that most full-time travelers use as domiciles are Texas, Florida and South Dakota and we chose South Dakota. To learn more about establishing a domicile, read our post about it here.

All of our regular USPS mail is sent to our address in South Dakota. We can also have any packages sent there shipped via any other carriers, but we try to avoid doing that so we don’t have to pay to have them shipped to our current location. We get an email any time a new piece of mail arrives and I’m able to look online to see what it is (they scan the front of each piece of mail). When we want our mail, I schedule a shipment and our mail is sent to us. But where is it sent?, you ask.

  • Our Current Location – Many campgrounds will accept mail on your behalf; just check with them how it should be addressed in order for it to get to you. Also, make sure they accept mail from all carriers — USPS, UPS, FedEx, Amazon. Not all carriers can make general deliveries to all locations.
  • USPS General Delivery – The local post office will accept general deliveries on your behalf and hold on to them for up to 30 days. Always call the post office to see if they accept general deliveries before having something sent there (the USPS website can be inaccurate). Also, they only accept things shipped via the USPS, so don’t expect them to accept your Amazon packages. This has worked great for us when we’ve stayed at State Parks/National Parks. The address for general deliveries is: Your Name, General Delivery, City, State, Zip Code. Make sure the package is addressed to whoever is picking it up as you may need to present your ID.
  • UPS Store – Just as the USPS accepts USPS-shipped packages on your behalf, UPS Stores will accept UPS-shipped packages on your behalf; however, they may charge a fee. Again, call the store to make sure they offer this service.
  • Amazon Locker – Amazon Lockers are secure, self-service kiosks where customers can pick up Amazon.com packages at a time and place that is convenient for them. When you check out on Amazon, there’s a ‘Find an Amazon Locker’ option when choosing your delivery address. This service is most likely only available in cities of a certain size, but is also a great option for anyone who doesn’t want their packages stolen off their front porch.

So, that’s it! It’s fairly simple, but be forewarned, things move slowly this way. We often receive our mail about three weeks later than if we were in a bricks and sticks home. Make sure to sign up for paperless for everything you can. Our mail service will open and scan something if we request it, so we’re able to read the important stuff in a timely manner.

 

Atlatl Rock Campground at Valley of Fire SP

Campgrounds Info:

There are two campgrounds within Valley of Fire State Park: Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock. Both are first come, first served and Arch Rock, the more primitive of the two, is open seasonally. We chose to stay at Atlatl Rock because the sites are bigger, easier to maneuver, and more suitable for RVs, although we did see some people squeeze some fairly large rigs into spots at Arch Rock. We scored a nice pull through spot in the RV section! The RV sites are $10 more per day than the other sites, which are $20 per day. A lot of people seem to leave in the morning around 8-8:30, so the best time to arrive is around 9am. We showed up about 1:15 on a Wednesday afternoon and there were a couple of RV sites available, but the weekends during mild-temperature months are likely pretty full. There are amazing views at every turn throughout the park, and the campgrounds are no exception. They are clean and quiet and a lot of the sites are pretty private. We were blown away by the beauty of this park and we will definitely be back!

Address: 29450 Valley of Fire Road, Overton, NV 89040

Phone Number: (702) 397-2088

Amenities at Atlatl Rock Campground:

  • 44 Campsites – Half are semi-primitive (water spigot, shaded picnic table, fire ring, grill) and half are RV only (electric and water hookups, shaded picnic table, fire ring, grill).
  • Bathrooms with Flush Toilets
  • Showers (Free)
  • Self-Service Pay (Cash or Check Only)
  • Dumpsters
  • Ash Cans
  • Dump Station
  • Onsite Camp Hosts
Distant view of our site in Atlatl Rock Campground
Our site (#44) was a pull-through and had water and electric hookups.
Each site has a shaded picnic table, fire ring, and grill.
The view out our window of the moon rise.

Park Info:

There’s a $10 entrance fee to get into the park that can be put towards your campground fee. The park itself is doable in one day, but I’d allow at least two days to see the sites. The visitor center has little cards titled “What to Do & See in Valley of Fire…” …if you have two hours, …if you have half a day, and …if you have a full day. Recommendations for a full day are:

  • Drive White Domes Road and Fire Canyon Road; stop and take in the scenic vistas at areas such as Rainbow Vista and Fire Canyon
  • Hike the 1.25-mile roundtrip White Domes Trail, the 1.5-mile roundtrip Fire Wave Trail, and the 3/4-mile roundtrip Mouse’s Tank Trail
  • Check out the Native American petroglyphs at Atlatl Rock picnic area
  • Visit Arch Rock
  • Stop at the “Cabins” to see the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) enrollees who built the park’s infrastructure in the 1930s
  • Do the 1/8-mile walk to see Elephant Rock
  • Spend some time checking out the displays in the visitor center. Learn about Valley of Fire’s geologic history, human history, and flora and fauna
  • Stop at some sites along the main road, such as the 1/4-mile Petrified Logs Loop Trail and Seven Sisters picnic area
Slot canyon on the White Domes Trail, which was our favorite trail.
The remains of a movie set along the White Domes Trail. The 1965 movie was called ‘The Professionals’.
The Fire Wave at the end of the Fire Wave Trail.
Petroglyphs in Petroglyph Canyon along Mouse’s Tank Trail.
Sunset at Arch Rock
Petrified log at Petrified Logs West — Almost 225 million years old!
We were fortunate to see a herd of Desert Bighorn Sheep while driving along White Domes Road!

In the Area:

The city of Overton is less than a half-hour drive from Atlatl Rock Campground, or less than 20 minutes from the East Entrance of the park. There’s a grocery store, a gas station, a post office (that accepts general delivery), a McDonald’s, and a couple of local restaurants. Hoover Dam is about 60 miles away and is accessible through Lake Mead Recreational Area, which is six miles from the East Entrance of the park. Las Vegas is about an hour drive to the southwest.

We weren’t sure what to expect at Valley of Fire before arriving, but a handful of people that we had spoken to in the Las Vegas area said it was spectacular, and they were right! We were totally awed by it’s beauty and will definitely be back!

Things You Need to Start Your Airstream Travels

We did not spend one night in our Airstream before we started living in it full time — crazy, right? In the months that led up to our departure date, we scoured the interwebs to determine what things were needed to live and travel in an Airstream. Most items we purchased were hits; some were misses. After six weeks on the road, we’ve realized what’s important, what’s not, and what falls somewhere in between.

The following lists are what work for us in our life in our 2017 27FB International Signature. I have not included anything to do with the towing aspect including tow vehicle, mirrors, back-up camera, hitch, sway control, etc. I’m not posting links of where to find the products as that would take a looooong time, but if you want more info about something, let me know.

You Definitely, 100%, Need These Things:

  • Sewer Hose Kit
  • 30 Amp Power Cord (included with new Airstream)
  • Hose for Fresh Water Only (included with new Airstream)
  • Tire Chocks
  • Levelers
  • Bubble Levels
  • RV Toilet Paper
  • Tank Treatment Toilet Drop-Ins
  • Hitch Ball Lube
  • Disposable Gloves (for Dumping)

The above items will allow you to be fully hooked up, level, not roll away, and avoid poo issues (clogged black tank, stinky toilet, nasty hands) — so, the important stuff.

May Not Need Yet but Definitely Will Some Day:

  • Sewer Hose Extension
  • Sewer Hose Support
  • Hose to Flush Black Tank
  • 50 Amp to 30 Amp Adaptor

When I say some day, I mean some day soon. We lived without these items for a few days, but all but the sewer hose extension were purchased within the first week. The sewer hookup where we are currently staying is at the back of the site, so our original 15′ hose didn’t reach; therefore, we needed an extension. The hose support allows gravity to do it’s job when you empty the gray and black tanks. The hose to flush the black tank is used every time we empty it to get all of the ‘stuff’ washed off the sides of the tank. And the adaptor is used when only 50 Amp service is available, which happened at the first place we stayed.

Our 15′ sewer hose with 10′ extension which is supported with a sewer hose support system.

Don’t NEED, but Should Strongly Consider:

  • Hitch Lock
  • Propane Tank Lock
  • RV Surge Protector
  • Tire Pressure Monitoring System
  • LP Tank Monitoring System
  • Water Filter
  • Flexible Hose Protector

If we lived in a perfect world, you wouldn’t need the first two items — but we don’t, so you may want to consider them. The surge protector is a pricy item, but what’s even pricier is if you hook up to a bad current and it fries the electrical items in your Airstream. The tire pressure monitoring system is also a little pricy. If you don’t want to invest in it at this time, do make sure to purchase a tire pressure gauge and check the tires before every trip. There’s a lot of weight on those tires and they need to be topped off often, especially if they’re sitting in the sun. The LP tank monitoring system is so you know how much propane you have left. Some people may like to chance it, but we want to make sure we don’t run out on a night with below-freezing temps. For us, the water filter falls under necessity, but doesn’t for everyone. We don’t drink the water out of the faucets, but we do use it to shower, wash our hands, and wash the dishes, so we want the water to be clean. We hook the filter up at the spigot-end of the hose so that only filtered water runs through our hose.

Our Progressive Industries EMS-PT30C Portable EMS RV Surge Protector, which is secured with a cable and lock.
We mounted the monitor for the AP Products 024-1000 Tank Check LP with Monitor Kit under the SeeLevel Tank Monitor.

Don’t Need, but Make Life Easier:

  • Generator
  • Wet/Dry Vac
  • Small Air Compressor
  • Dehumidifier
  • Security Cables and Locks
  • Assorted Bungees and Straps
  • Assorted Baskets and Bins
  • Assorted Mounting Tape/Hooks (Velcro, 3M, Scotch)
  • Museum Putty
  • Magnetic Knife Holder
  • Magnetic Spice Tins

Some people will never use a generator — it all depends on what type of Airstreamer you are. They are expensive, so do not buy one until you need it. We use the (small) wet/dry vac to vacuum out the truck (often) and seal things into Space Bags. We have a small air compressor that we use to fill our tires. The dehumidifier is a ? for us thus far. Airstream owners swear that you need one because moisture = bad, but to date we’ve only been in the Southwest, where the humidity has been 25% at its highest and zero precipitation, so we haven’t needed to use it yet. Security cables and locks are important if you want to lock up your generator or surge protector or whatnot. They aren’t that expensive and they don’t take up a lot of room, so you can have them on hand if the need arises. The next four items are all about organization and securing things. For instance, we have our generator and gas can strapped in in the bed of our truck so they don’t slide around when we travel. We’ve used various (removable) hooks throughout the trailer, velcro to hold rugs in place, (removable) 3M tape to hang things on the wall, and museum putty to keep light things on the counter in place. And baskets — so many baskets! For DVDs and office supplies and toiletries and basically anywhere a basket fits. The last two items get items out of the kitchen drawers/cabinets and into an otherwise dead space. We mounted the knife holder above our stove and have the spice tins stuck on the vent hood.

Both the Ouddy 16″ Magnetic Knife Holder and the Kamenstein Magnetic Multi-Purpose Spice Storage Tins were purchased from Amazon.

So, that’s it — the important stuff, anyways! Of course, there’s still the camping stuff (propane grill, chairs, cooler, etc.) and the hiking stuff (backpacks, boots, headlamps, etc.) and the appliances (coffee maker, InstantPot, travel iron, etc.) and work-related stuff (printer and Gator Case for the iMac), but those are individual choices only you can make.

 

 

 

 

How We Work on the Road

The number one thing that most people want to know when we tell them we live in our Airstream and travel full time is what do we do for work.

As I’ve mentioned in a previous post, we own an ERP consulting business that we started six years ago. We’ve worked from home for the last six years, so there wasn’t a dramatic work-related lifestyle change when we decided to begin traveling. We did, however, search out the best products, devices, and services that would allow us to continue working remotely without interruption.

Cell Phones

We have three AT&T cell phones (two personal, one business) with unlimited data. We also have one Verizon cell phone (which is a spare) with unlimited data. We are able to use these as hotspots when needed. It’s nice to have options, as the cell signals can differ significantly between the two companies. A bonus with the AT&T phones is that we can stream HBO on DirecTV Now and it doesn’t count against our data usage. With the Verizon phone, we get NFL Mobile, so we never have to miss a Packer game! All of the phones are supposed to slow down after using 22GB, but we’ve maxed out on one of the phones this month and have not noticed a slow down where we’re currently staying.

Verizon Jetpack 6620L MiFi

The MiFi is a wireless router that acts as a mobile wifi hotspot. We also have unlimited data with this, but once we hit 15GB, it’s supposed to be throttled to 600kbps. You can find more information about the MiFi here, although our particular version is no longer available.

WeBoost RV Cellular Signal Booster

We bought the weBoost Drive 4G-X RV signal booster to help boost our cell and data signals in areas where they may be lacking. From their website: “The Drive 4G-X RV is our powerful in-vehicle cell phone signal booster kit certified for use anywhere in the US. The Drive 4G-X RV boosts voice and data with max FCC-allowed 50 dB system gain, enhancing 4G LTE, as well as 3G network signals, up to 32x. RVers get fewer lost connections and dead zones, better call quality as well as faster data uploads and downloads whether parked or in motion in their RV.  Works in all classes of RV; Class A, Class C and all towables.” An antenna needs to be installed on the top of the trailer and is connected to an indoor desktop antenna. We’ve noticed that you need to be within a few feet of the indoor antenna in order for the signal to be boosted, which generally works fine as the antenna is in the storage compartment above the kitchen table. When we’re in the bedroom in the back of the trailer, we generally have a weaker signal. You can find our particular model here.

The weBoost antenna on the top of our trailer

Computers

Travis uses a 27″ iMac 3.4GHz Intel Core i7 with 32GB of RAM and a 3TB Fusion Drive. When we are towing, the iMac gets secured in a Gator Cases Tote Bag, available from Amazon here. The bag fits perfectly in the space at the end of his bed so we don’t need to worry about it sliding around at all. I use a 13″ MacBook Pro 2.3GHz Intel Core i5 with 16GB of RAM and a 500GB SSD Drive.

Gator Cases Creative Pro Series Nylon Carry Tote Bag for Apple 27″ iMac Desktop Computer
Fits perfectly at the end of the twin bed in our International 27FB

Printer

We found the perfect printer for our needs! We purchased the HP OfficeJet 250 All-in-One Portable Printer with Wireless & Mobile Printing. It wirelessly scans, copies and prints (in color, if needed). It has a battery so it only needs to be plugged in occasionally to charge. The best part?! It easily fits in the drawer beneath the bench along with packs of paper. You can find it on Amazon here.

Fits in the bench drawer with room to spare!

Furnace Creek at Death Valley NP

Furnace Creek Campground is the perfect home base for exploring Death Valley!

First, about the campground…

We knew more than six months in advance that we’d be staying here as Travis and a friend of ours had signed up for the Death Valley Half Marathon and Marathon respectively. Because of the advanced notice, I was able to book the exact site we wanted as soon as it became available through www.recreation.gov. We chose site 76 because it had full hookups and was a pull through. It was also extremely long and level and was the easiest set up we’ve had to date. The Furnace Creek Visitor’s Center was about 100 yards away and a restroom with flush toilets was about 20 yards away. There’s also a sink area near the restroom where you can wash dishes. Each site has a fire ring and picnic table, and the pull throughs are blacktopped.

The Furnace Creek area is also home to The Ranch at Death Valley which has a couple of restaurants, a golf course, a hotel, a general store, the Borax Museum, a swimming pool, restrooms, laundry facilities, sport courts and a gas station. Although there are not showers in the campground itself, The Ranch has shower facilities that you can use for $5, which also gives you access to the swimming pool. The pass is good for 24 hours, so if you time it right, you can get two days’ worth of showers out of one pass.

Exploring Death Valley…

Just like any National Park, you have to drive a little to take in all of the sights. Luckily, many of the most recommended sights Death Valley has to offer are short drives from Furnace Creek. We got to Death Valley on a Friday afternoon. After unhitching the trailer at the campground, we still had plenty of daylight left to explore. Our first stop was Badwater Basin, the lowest point in North America.

Next, we did the easy 1-mile-roundtrip hike to Natural Bridge.

After the hike, we went back to the campground for dinner. After all, the guys had a race to run in the morning and here’s something I didn’t think about — when the sun goes down, it gets dark. Really dark, fast — so don’t forget your headlamps. Death Valley is a Gold-Tier International Dark-Sky Association park, meaning that the skies there are affected by only the smallest amounts of light pollution, classifying it at the highest level of IDA designation. We grew up in a small town in Wisconsin where there are many open areas free of heavy light pollution, but never in my life have I seen such a dark sky and such bright stars — so amazing!

Our second day in Death Valley started with the marathon/half marathon. While the guys were running, the ladies took a drive along the nine-mile Artist’s Drive that passes through Artist’s Palette, with mineral-rich rocks displaying an array of colors.

We had a lazy afternoon involving some pool time, showers, and naps, but then decided to catch the sunset at Zabriskie Point before getting dinner at the Date Grove Diner.

On our final full day in Death Valley, we opted to do the moderately-difficult 4-mile Mosaic Canyon hike, just past Stovepipe Wells. The polished marble narrows made this hike a little interesting, but all in all I would say it’s on the low end of moderate for difficulty.

After the hike, we stopped at the Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes but only looked on from afar.

As we passed back through Stovepipe Wells on our way back towards Furnace Creek, we stopped at the gas station/general store to fill the gas tank and pick up a few supplies and souvenirs. **Important Tip** The gas in Stovepipe Wells is almost a $1.50 cheaper than in Furnace Creek, so fill up there! Our last stop for the day was the Salt Creek Interpretive Trail to see if we could see the rare pupfish (we did).

We bugged out fairly early on Monday morning as we had to drop the trailer off in Pahrump and then take our friends to Las Vegas, and then head back to Pahrump. Death Valley was very cool and we’re looking forward to exploring it again in the future. Dante’s View and Scotty’s Castle were both closed while we were there and we didn’t get the chance to drive over to Racetrack Playa to see the ‘sailing stones’.

Nice to Meet You!

We thought it would be a good idea to introduce ourselves!

WHO:

We are Travis and Missy. We were born and raised in a small town in Wisconsin, but moved to San Diego about seven years ago. Travis is a Marine Corps veteran and we own an ERP consulting business, Bird Rock Solutions. Our 13-year-old dog Max is along for the ride.

WHAT:

We are (fairly new) full-time Airstreamers traveling in a 2017 International Signature 27FB and towing with a 2017 Ford F-150.

WHEN:

We started full timing on 1/15/18 and we will be traveling for an undetermined amount of time. I guess we’ll travel until we feel the need to put down roots somewhere again.

WHERE:

We plan to travel to all parts of the country as well as Canada. We are very much looking forward to checking out places that we’ve been wanting to visit but never made it to, as well as checking out places we had no idea existed.

WHY:

Well, we tend to get restless. In the 14+ years we’ve been together, we’ve moved 9 times, once 2000+ miles. We love experiencing new places and people — what better way to do that than travel the country?!

HOW:

We’ve talked about full-time travel for years, and recently things aligned to allow us to do it.

First, we own our own business and we work remotely the majority of the time. As far as income, nothing changed for us when we hit the road — we just need to make sure we have a decent internet connection most of the time.

Second, we owned a home in North County San Diego for 3.5 years. We bought at a good time and then the market got hot in San Diego, and we decided to sell. With the profits from the sale, we were able to purchase our truck and Airstream outright; therefore, our living expenses are basically just campsite fees, gas and food.

You know, just some candid shots of us sitting outside our trailer.

 

 

 

 

Wine Ridge RV Resort and Cottages

We spent five weeks at Wine Ridge Resort in Pahrump, Nevada. If you’ve never heard of Pahrump, don’t worry — most people haven’t. It’s located between Death Valley National Park (to the west) and Las Vegas (to the east), and it takes about an hour to get to either one.

The resort is very nice and the monthly rate is more than reasonable. We were there for 36 nights at $9.63 per night plus electricity, which, for the five weeks, was $53.82. Our grand total was $400.52.

Address: 3800 Winery Road, Pahrump, NV 89048

Phone Number: (775) 751-7805

Amenities include:

  • Full Hookup
  • Two Pools and a Hot Tub
  • Individual Bathrooms with Showers (So great!)
  • Laundry
  • Pickle Ball, Bocce Ball and Horseshoes
  • Fitness Center (Pretty decent, actually)
  • RV/Car Wash
  • Clubhouse with Pool Table, Shuffle Board, and a Lending Library with DVDs, Board Games, Books and Puzzles
  • Complimentary Breakfasts Most Mornings
  • Weekly Activities including Poker, Bingo and Karaoke
  • Mail Service
  • Cottages

Located next door to the resort is the Pahrump Valley Winery (voted #1 in Nevada) that offers free tastings and the Symphony’s Restaurant, which, according to locals, is the best restaurant in Pahrump. The wine is excellent and the food was pretty good.

Pahrump Valley Winery

Pahrump itself doesn’t have a lot going on, unless you’re really into smoky casinos and fireworks stores, but we tried to take advantage of everything it did have to offer:

  • Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area: About a 40-minute drive from Pahrump, Red Rock is home to a 13-mile, extremely scenic drive with multiple overlooks, parking areas and picnic areas. There are also 26 different hiking trails of varying length and difficulty — our favorite was the Calico Tanks Trail. Rock climbing is allowed but you need a permit. Definitely a must see if in the Pahrump area and it’s only about a 20-minute drive from the Las Vegas Strip.

    View along the Calico Tanks Trail
  • Death Valley National Park: While there are places to stay in Death Valley, the campgrounds fill up fast and the hotels are crazy expensive. Pahrump is a decent location for making day trips to the park. As we had friends visit to run the Death Valley Marathon, we did hook up the Airstream and tow to Death Valley to spend three nights at the Furnace Creek Campground.

    Badwater Basin, the lowest point in North America (-282 feet)
  • Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the refuge protects threatened and endangered species, many of which occur nowhere else in the world, such as the Devils Hole pupfish.

    Crystal Spring – A true oasis in the desert!
  • China Ranch Date Farm: A family-owned date farm and bakery that serves the regional delight, date shakes. There are also a handful of trails and a cute little gift shop.

    China Ranch Date Farm (The date vanilla chip cookies were delicious!)

There are a few other attractions in the area that either didn’t interest us or we didn’t have time for: Dumont Dunes, Tacopa Hot Springs and the Amargosa Opera House.

For the most part, we enjoyed our time in Pahrump, although five weeks was too long; however, five weeks is probably too long to spend anywhere. It was nice to be able to have visitors, which we did on two different occasions. And it was very convenient to be stationary for a little while so we could get our mail sent to us regularly and be able to do some shopping on Amazon. Also, Travis had to make a business trip at one point, so being close to a large airport was important. We’d stay at Wine Ridge Resort again, but probably just for a few nights.